Everything You Need To Know

Do QR Codes Have To Be A Certain Size? - Feb 2017

People often ask how big or small (in terms of physical surface area) a QR Code can be, well there are no technical limits. A QR Code doesn't have to be a set size and can be printed to any required size. The surface area of a QR Code is only limited by its environment and expected use combined with the resolution of the scanning device. There isn't a technical limitation.

The amount of actual data a QR Code can store is not related to its surface area, it's determine by the number of rows and columns the code contains which in turns determines the number of modules (small squares) you will see when looking at the code.

Big QR Code Small QR Code

To demonstrate this, these two QR Codes are the same code containing the same data. One is simply stretched larger than the other with the only difference being that the physical width and high of module ends up larger but the number of modules that hold the data and their relative position remains the same.

How you intend to use a QR Code and where you plan to place it should determine how big you make it. If you want a QR Code for a billboard for example, then you expect that people will be scanning the code from a distance. Therefore printing the QR Code at a physical size of 20x20 feet is acceptable.

When scanning from a distance, that larger size is key. If you didn't print that billboard QR Code big and instead printed a 1x1 Inch QR Code, it's likely it would be too small for any QR Code reader to pick up at a distance.

Similarly, you wouldn’t want a 20ft QR Code in an area where people are forced to stand 1ft from the code. It would be impossible for them to get the entire image into their scanner.

So the size of your code should be determined by the distance users are expected to scan it from but technically there really are no limits to how big or small you can make it. You may find yourself limited by the resolution of the printer when printing really small QR Codes, and you should always test your codes in their intended environment.

 

Keep Reading: 12. Are QR Codes Reliable?

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